US & World

Winter Olympics stats: Norway's record haul, Germany's golden Games and more

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Norwegian Marit Bjorgen’s golden farewell

Norway topped so many podiums they ran out of commemorative shoes, Germany enjoyed a gloriously golden fortnight, and the United States’ women “saved” their country’s 2018 Winter Olympics.

There were 102 gold medals up for grabs across 15 sports in Pyeongchang, with the likes of big air snowboarding, mixed-doubles curling, mass start speed skating and mixed-team alpine skiing added to the programme.

Ester Ledecka won two golds in two different sports, Marit Bjorgen became the most decorated Winter Olympian of all time, and five was the magic number for Great Britain’s competitors.

Here BBC Sport looks at the stats behind the medals in Pyeongchang.

Norway enjoy record-breaking Olympics

This was a remarkable Games for Norway – minnows in terms of population but powerhouses in the winter sports world – as they surpassed USA’s record of most medals won at a single Winter Olympics.

The Americans racked up 37 at Vancouver in 2010, but the Norwegians finished on 39 in Pyeongchang, with Bjorgen winning her fifth medal of the Games in the final event, the women’s cross-country skiing mass start.

Their final tally was 13 more than their previous best medal haul of 26 – set at both Lillehammer in 1994, and Sochi last time out. They did this with a team of 109 athletes – 133 fewer than USA sent to Pyeongchang, and 45 fewer than Germany.

Both Norway and Germany finished with 14 goals – matching the record set by Canada at Vancouver in 2010.

Norway have now finished top of the medal table at eight Winter Games, but this is the first time since 2002.

They and Austria are the only two countries to have won more medals at the Winter Olympics than in summer Games.

“These guys have an extreme need to come first. They are obsessed about winning,” said the country’s chef de mission Tore Ovrebo.

‘No jerks’ rule helps Norway thrive

Norway’s annual sports budget of about £13.7m is less than half the amount UK Sport provided Britain’s Winter Olympic competitors for Pyeongchang alone (£28.35m).

Ovrebo recently told Time